More random findings from Sweden (Scandinavia trip)

One person I spoke here to estimated there are now 5,000 daily Swedish blogs, although it’s in online communities that Swedes have largely collected, somewhat reflecting the left-leaning community spirit of the culture which grew out of its 60s socialist roots.

Sweden’s eBay ain’t eBay (Scandinavia Trip Part 2)

I met and interviewed the two founders of Sweden’s biggest online auction, Tradera.com.

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Although it’s an easy pitch to call them an eBay copy, in fact these like-able young entrepreneurs started and stuck with the auction business right the way through massive competitions from outside players like eBay and QXL, and the dotcom nuclear winter of 2001-2003. They have emerged with 90% of the Swedish auctions market. In other words they out-ebay’d ebay.

My Scandinavian trip – part 1

At some point there’ll be a more detailed report on my findings in Scandinavia, but for now, here’s a smattering of some of the people I’ve been talking to and the information I’ve gathered on the ground in Stockholm, Helsinki and Tallin (Estonia).

So to Stockholm… (and Helsinki and Tallinn)

I’m in Stockholm this week (till Friday) researching tech, media and mobile companies here for the The Guardian and New Media Age magazine, among others. Email me if you fall into that category and want to meet up.

Web 2.0 means marketing is in trouble

A lot of the discussion about the so-called new wave of “Web 2.0” has centred around technology. But what effect is this new era going to have on marketing?

“Web 2.0” as a phrase first appeared in the title of an O’Reilly conference in 2004. It was obviously boosterish, and took advanatge of the new wave of web companies doing strange new things with RSS and the like. Web 2.0 referred to using the Web as a “platform” instead of just as a loose conglomeration of interlinked sites.

Handelaar is alright

It’s not said often enough – especially by me – that John Handelaar is one OK bloke. Way back, I met John during the unbelievably bad Internet slump of 2002 when to say you’d been involved in the boom was a little like admitting you’d been rigging UN aid funds to Las Vegas during Live 8.

TBL is blogging

Tim Berners Lee has started a blog and his first post had 455 comments! (And it appears to be in Drupal which also powers mbites.com)

He’s a dinosaur

“I’m a dinosaur, part of a shrinking generation of daily print newspaper readers who likely will disappear in a few decades. And we’re being replaced by folks who “consume media” through the use of RSS feeders, Web portals and blogs.”

Casual content?

Evan Williams calls content generated by ordinary people ‘casual content’ but I don’t see anything casual about stuff like Moblog.co.uk’s pictures of the Buncefield oil clouds.

MSNBC – blogads won’t affect search

MSNBC’s plans to flood the Internet with ads for its new shows is, well, really stupid. Sure, they are advertising on blogs via BlogAds. That’s very, well, nice. However, they’d be far better off using a blog network to provide direct links rather than trackable ad links – those would give them better search engine rankings. If they have targetted the right blogs, it may work. But since they’ve included UK blogs like mine (see right), I doubt they’ve put much thought into it!